Salary Negotiations: An Art and a Science

24 02 2015

By Lisa Stotlar

Negotiating salaries and other benefits can be hard. It’s hard because it involves risk. It’s hard because you don’t do it very often.

I love making this process easier for people. There are some tricks of the trade I’ve picked up that I hope can help demystify the whole thing for you. Let’s start with why you might not do it. Fear. It is a powerful emotion and can be very useful in this situation. Distinguishing whether the fear you’re feeling is a warning to prepare well for the negotiation or a sign to avoid the whole thing altogether is a good first step.

Group of Business People with Green Business

I’ve had lots of clients who negotiate successfully and some who don’t. The difference is in the preparation, understanding/managing fear, and reading the employer’s signals during the negotiation. I call all this the “Art and Science” of negotiating. The “Science” is the formal prep you do beforehand and the “Art” is the tap-dancing you will need to do in the moment because you never know what they’ll throw at you in a conversation.

The “Science”

Books, web articles, and/or a good career counselor/coach can teach you the science of negotiating – the concrete how-to’s, the math of it, the “if this happens, then do this” scenarios, i.e., all the “homework” you need to do to prepare for the negotiation as well as how to handle your fears. But if you don’t work on your Art too, things can go badly, quickly.

The “Art”

Be sure and pay attention to the subtle clues you can collect during the whole interview process. By the time the offer arrives, you ideally will have a sense of whether the hiring manager/company is flexible, has some wiggle room in the budget, has rigid HR restrictions, really wants/needs you for the role, etc.

All these things give you an idea of how much you can ask for and how carefully you need to tread during the meeting. Remember to be fully present, listen carefully, and assess where the delicate balance/threshold is in the conversation. For example, if the person says his/her “hands are tied” and can’t give you X, then you need to hear that and thank them for letting you know rather than push the issue. Trying to stay on some script (the Science) would be a bad move at this moment.

Here are some real examples of how these things can play out well when you mix Art and Science:

Real Stories as Examples

One of my clients was offered $20K more than the fair market value for her type of job. She didn’t ask for more money, but she did negotiate other things. She had done her homework and was fully ready to negotiate, but the Art of this was to recognize that they were already going above and beyond for her and so it would have seemed odd/out of touch not to recognize that. She happily accepted the offer after a little back & forth about the start date. She wanted a real vacation before starting and was able to get that.

Another was offered a position at a major university. It was a very good offer, but he was coming from the corporate world and had been used to negotiating fairly hard. I recommended that he soften his tune for this if he really wanted the job. Universities often have clear guidelines about what they will and won’t offer. So gently asking if there was any flexibility in the salary was going to be a much better approach than assuming there was more money and simply throwing out a higher number. It turned out well. The hiring manager went back to HR to negotiate on my client’s behalf. The manager and my client were in a sense already a team – bonding over this issue. He ended up with just $2K more, but the positive relationship with this manager was worth its weight in gold. And he did get some other perks including the ability to work from home fairly regularly and to attend at least 2 national conferences every year.

Another client was afraid to negotiate, but was determined to do it and really worked hard on preparing. But … in the end, I actually recommended that he not negotiate salary or a signing bonus. I could sense the offer was a bit precarious and he was desperate for the job. He wasn’t able to fully recognize important nuances in conversation partly because English was his second language. Every time we role-played, he was very forceful in his language and tone. He ended up negotiating a later start date, plus 2 weeks off for a pre-planned vacation, and some tools he needed for the position like a laptop and cell phone. He’s been in the job for about 6 months now and loves it. He feels he negotiated well and I agree.

Win-Win

If you decide you want to negotiate the salary, remember the whole exchange needs to be a Win-Win. You want to get something (Win), but they need something too (Win). So if for example, you’re offered a salary of $100K and their range is $95-115K, then you need to ask for more than you ultimately want to end up with in order to bring their final offer amount up.

For example, let’s say you want to bring the offer up by at least $5K – then nicely ask if there’s some flexibility with the salary because you were “hoping to get something in the $110s, if possible.” This will hopefully get you a final offer of $105-110K. That would be more money for you (Win), but still less money than the high end of their range (Win). You both get something out of the deal.

Note: If you had just said directly – I’d like $105K, the middle ground (Win-Win) would have yielded you about $103K. So know going into the discussion where you want that final number to be and then plan your strategy accordingly.

Lots of things to potentially ask for …

When thinking about negotiating, think about all the things you might want to negotiate for. By expanding your options, you will have the overall Win-Win results you want. Consider …

  1. Title
  • Title can affect money and future titles
  1. Money
  • Base Salary
  • Salary increase at 3 or 6 months if meet specific criteria
  • Bonus (annual, at 3 months, signing bonus, etc.)
  • Commission
  • Profit sharing
  • Stock options
  • Overtime $ or Comp time
  • If not being given medical, etc., ask for additional $ (up to 30%)
  1. Time
  • Request time off for a scheduled vacation, surgery, etc.
  • Request a specific start date so you can have a real break before starting
  1. Schedule
  • Work remotely X days/week
  • Work off-site
  • Flexible work schedule
  • Later or earlier starting (or ending) time every day or on specific days
  • Longer lunches when you want them – or the ability to skip lunch and leave earlier
  • 4-day work week (10 hours/day) or some other variation you need/want
  • Work part-time or work part-time at particular times (for example, summers)
  1. Benefits
  • Medical/Dental/Vision/Disability/Life Insurance
  • Vacation days, comp time, wellness/personal days, doctor appointment & sick time, other?
  • Pension, 401K
  • Matching investment program
  • Parking costs/train pass
  • Childcare subsidy
  • Gym membership
  1. Training
  • Conferences
  • Association dues
  • Tuition Reimbursement for you, your children
  1. Equipment
  • Cell phone, laptop, car, etc.
  • Equipment for your home office if you’ll be doing work from home
  1. Relocation
  • Moving expenses
  • Mortgage assistance

By thinking about negotiations in a much larger context than just salary, and remembering to aim for the Win-Win, you can end up with a much more robust offer.

Remember, no matter how it all plays out, end the negotiations on a high note. Be grateful that they tried to get you a good salary, even if they ultimately aren’t able to offer you what you exactly want. Being gracious about the process and giving them a final “Yes, I happily accept” answer will start you on a very positive path.

I wish you all the best in your next negotiations!

About the Author:
Lisa Stotlar, MA is a career counselor/coach for CareerGenerations in Palo Alto, a career services firm she co-founded with Ellen Shulman, MA in 2010. She has successfully helped thousands of people discover and celebrate their gifts and find meaningful work – and negotiate all sorts of Win-Win packages. For questions about negotiating or other career topics, you’re welcome to schedule a free 15-minute phone consultation with Lisa or her colleague Ellen at www.careergenerations.com and if you’d like to know more about negotiating and gain some invaluable practice, sign up for their March 11 $mart Negotiations Workshop.





10 F’s for a Fabulous ’15

8 01 2015

I have to confess that I’m not big on New Year’s resolutions, in fact I kind of stink at them! I’ve started some years with great intentions (usually too long a list!) that didn’t last long…or I gave up entirely and didn’t make ANY resolutions. Hey, then there’s nothing to break!

But I’m approaching this year differently. I’m just going to choose ONE thing on which I’m going to focus, and really give it my best. It doesn’t mean I won’t be working on other things, but keeping it simple and keeping to one big commitment more likely to stick.

I also am also giving this new year the theme “Fabulous ’15” as the motto for this fresh, opportunity-filled year.

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My wish is that you also have a Fabulous ’15 — and that this is a very special year for you in which new experiences, people, opportunities and adventures come to you and your families.

When I thought of the “Fabulous” theme, other words starting with F (OK, just the clean words!) came to mind.

Take a look at some of these ideas and see which one resonates most with you for your own focus to make this a fabulous year:

1. Fight

Stand up and be counted for a good cause. This is not a call to arms, but an idea to shift our energy off our own goals and challenges and to dedicate it to protecting or advocating for others or for your community. I love the lyrics from Don Quixote’s song in “Man of La Mancha,” “To dream the impossible dream…to right the unrightable wrong.” The full lyrics are here.

There are so many needs out there, it can be overwhelming. Yet if all of us choose just one special cause, person or issue in which to some extra time, we can really change the world!

2. Fearlessness

I’m striving myself to not let fears, real or imagined, hold me back. The old adage, “Feel the fear and do it anyway” is the way I’m choosing to go. For high performers in this valley, the fear of failure often thwarts innovation and new directions.

I’m resolving to be more audacious in my goals and dreams. To embrace risk in a positive way and push myself out of my own comfort zone. When we think of the amazing things that are accomplished, it’s often on the heels of what seemed like failure. I’m encouraged by the famous failures-turned-success of Edison, Churchill, Disney and Lincoln. This article profiles just a few who risked failure time after time — which led to remarkable achievements that changed the world for each of us.

Where can you rush in where only fools dare to go? Let’s go forward boldly and dream audaciously!

3. Finish

Is there anything that has been on your life or “To Do” list that you’ve been meaning to get around to but it still languishes? How about dedicating some special effort into finally wrapping up that item or action so you won’t be haunted by it — and feel a sense of accomplishment instead? After struggling to revamp the KIT List web site, the new site is almost ready. I will feel SUCH relief when it’s done! Stay tuned for news about the new, more robust site being up!

4. Faith
No matter where we are in our spiritual walk, there’s always room to grow more deeply in our faith, and to work on our own rough edges that life, family, friends and experiences help to smooth.

In these recent years when I’ve said goodbye to loving parents, close friends and people who’ve inspired and touched me, my faith has given me the strength to face the tough stuff, envelop me in grace to see the meaning in the difficult times and to see how there is a gift and blessing that comes from even the hardest things.

I’ve also been deeply grateful to friends who’ve been there for me, and I hope I’ve been there for them in their own challenging times. Illness, death, and hardships come with being a participant on this Earth — and faith and friends give context, meaning and hope to not only endure but to ultimately flourish and grow into a better person as a result.

5. Foundation

Is there something you’ve been wanting to do to build or strengthen for your future? A new skill to enhance your career marketability — or just to learn something that has always interested you? Better financial planning?

I’m an excellent procrastinator for many things on my life “To Do” List. I’ve found that what has really helped me is to have a success team of friends that you meet with monthly (and even do mid-month check-in calls) to help you keep on track and provide what I call “gentle accountability.” It’s good to keep the group small with 4 – 6 people who will commit to each other and to meet regularly. I’ve had various groups over the years who’ve been an incredible help in my setting and reaching short-term and long-term (still in process!) goals. It’s so wonderful to help and encourage your fellow group members and to see the large and small things accomplished. How about starting a group of your own?

Also, my sister, Kelly Connelly (and co-moderator of the KIT List) has found Michael Hyatt http://michaelhyatt.com/ to be an excellent resource for free tips, webinars and podcasts on how to really accomplish the things you want in your career and life. He’s upbeat, interesting and highly informative. It’s worth checking out his resources and get things really moving for yourself. Listen to a podcast while driving and get motivated!

6. Forgiveness

This is an opportunity for grace. Are there things you need to forgive in yourself, or in others, that will free you for better things? The greatest part about the remarkable story of Louis Zamperini in the book and recent movie, “Unbroken,” is not just his courage and resilience, but his freedom when he ultimately forgave his captor and persecutor in the Japanese prison camp where he was the special target of abuse and torture. Forgiveness through faith ended up freeing him from PTSD and alcoholism — which saved his marriage and restored his life and family.

Another favorite book is “The Hiding Place” by Corrie ten Boom, who hid and saved over 800 Jews during World War II, but was ultimately captured and sent to the notorious Ravensbruck concentration camp. Her sister died there, and Corrie experienced much suffering while trying to help and inspire faith and hope among fellow prisoners. But she, too, was able to forgive a brutal guard, and the entire nation, and she spent time after the war helping to heal and rebuild people in shattered Germany. Corrie dedicated the rest of her life as a “Tramp for The Lord” (the title of her 2nd book) traveling the world to share the story of redemption, love and forgiveness.

7. Fitness
This is that time of year that we all start with renewed zeal for exercise and health. I don’t happen to one who loves this naturally, so I have to find ways to make it fresh, fun and more enjoyable. I’ve found it a HUGE help to have workout buddies. I’ll get my reluctant tail to the gym or out on a bike ride when I’ve made a commitment to someone else.

Thank you to my friends and family over the years who have been great fitness buddies. I may not like working out, but you make it much more enjoyable! Is there someone who can help you try a new sport or new routine?

8. Friends and Family
It goes without saying how important family and friends are in enriching our lives. We all know that time is precious and fleeting. No matter what our age, health and just being alive can’t be taken for granted. Work and other commitments make far greater demands on our time in this era. What are ways you can build in more device-free time with those you love and experience new things together?

During this holiday season, my family and friends actually spent time doing old-tech games like Charades and Taboo (pretty hilarious). We also did hikes and bike rides, cookie baking/decorating, going to the beach (the source of this blog’s photo! Carmel was beautiful and we saw a large pod of dolphins frolicking in the waves. What a delight!) and other relaxing things that were just a great way to spend time together.

Slowing down and finding new ways to enjoy time together will reap many rewards in our over-programmed society. Also, is there a way to add new and interesting people into your circle of friends? They can open up new horizons and experiences for you, too.

9. Farewells

People, habits, jobs…it’s hard to accept that change is a natural and important part of life. Sometimes we have to say goodbye to loved ones who’ve died, or to jobs that no longer fit us, or to habits that don’t serve us any longer. I’m learning to embrace change more (it’s a challenge for me!). Instead, I’m looking to find ways to try to get ahead of the change curve (what new trends, learning, skills, talents will be tapped?). I realize that while nothing really ever stays the same, how can I make change work to the positive — and mitigate any possible negative impacts proactively?

10. Fun!
In the midst of the hectic pace and overbooked lives so many of us face, let’s be sure to allow ourselves time for pure FUN — with family, friends and new people. Now that even kids’ sports have become so competitive and stressful, we’ve lost the element of fun, learning, exploring, making mistakes and bumping into new and unexpected things! We need free time for true “re-creation.” Unstructured time without electronic devices allows for better ways to tap into our creativity. A good laugh, or even a smile, releases endorphins into our bodies. When was the last time you allowed yourself to just have fun?

I know, this is a long list, but just choose ONE thing to differently.

You’re more likely to be able to stick to it for the long run this year. Keep it simple and avoid the temptation to have a long laundry list of resolutions. Choose one theme on which to focus and REALLY make a difference that you can appreciate and be proud of at the end of this bright, new year! I’m going to do the same.

If you’d like to share your own ideas or themes for the New Year, please add your comment below!

Kelly, Amy and I wish you a FABULOUS 2015 ahead!

Warmly,

Your KIT List Team:
Sue and Kelly Connelly, and Amy Plunkett





“Career Choices You Will Regret In 20 Years” – By Bernard Marr

18 12 2014

Hello Everyone,

This article by Bernard Marr makes some excellent points that you may not have considered — or smart thinking you already know but need to reinforce in your job selection. This was worth sharing with our community!

Warmly,

Sue

Career Choices You Will Regret In 20 Years
By Bernard Marr

12-15-2014

Every day we are faced with choices in our careers that will affect us over the long term. Should I volunteer for that new project? Should I ask for a raise? Should I take a sabbatical? Should I say yes to overtime?

But sometimes we miss the biggest choices that will cause us to look back on our careers 20 years from now with pride and contentment — or regret.

Here are some of the career choices we often make but will regret deeply in 20 years’ time:

Pretending to be something you’re not.

Maybe you’re pretending to be a sports fan to impress your boss, or you’re keeping your mouth shut about something to keep the peace. Maybe you’re pretending that you’re an expert in something that’s really not your cup of tea. But continuously pretending to be something you’re not is not being true to yourself and will keep you feeling empty.

Making decisions based only on money.

Whether we’re talking about your personal salary or your project’s budget, making decisions solely based on money is almost never a good idea. Sure, it’s important to run the numbers, but there are dozens of other factors — including your gut feeling — you’ll want to take into account.

Thinking you can change something about the job.

Much like a relationship, if you go into a job thinking, “This would be the perfect job, if only…” that’s a red flag. Chances are, unless you’re taking a leadership, C-level position, you aren’t going to be able to change things that are fundamentally wrong.

Settling.

You’ve got an OK job, with an OK salary, and OK benefits, but what you really want is… You’re not doing yourself any favors settling for something that is just OK. Believe in yourself enough to go after what you deserve, whether it’s a new position, a pay rise, or an opportunity.

Working 50, 60, 80 hour weeks.

You might think you have to work that much — because it’s expected, because you need the money, because you want to look good to your boss — but no one reaches their deathbed and says, “Gosh, I wish I’d spent more time working.”

Putting friends and family last.

Being successful at your career means surrounding yourself with supportive people — and often, those people aren’t your coworkers or employees, they’re your friends and family. Ruin those relationships and you may find your career success just doesn’t matter as much.

Micromanaging everything.

This applies to your team and employees, but also to life in general. If you micromanage everything instead of sometimes just letting life happen, you’ll find yourself constantly battling anxiety and overwhelm.

Avoid making mistakes.

If you’re actively avoiding making mistakes in your career, then you’re not taking risks. And while you may keep up the status quo, you won’t be rewarded, either. Take the risk. Make the mistake. Own it and learn from it.

Thinking only of yourself.

The best networking strategy you can possibly have is to actively look for opportunities to help others. If you’re always putting yourself and your needs first, you’ll find you don’t get very far.

Not valuing your own happiness.

It’s a sad truth that people often believe they can put off happiness until later, but sometimes later doesn’t come. Prioritize being happy today. That might mean switching jobs, or it might just mean choosing to be happier with the job you’ve got.

What do you think are the biggest career choices people regret? As always, I’d love to hear your ideas and stories in the comments below.

Also, if you would like to read my regular posts send me a LinkedIn invite. And, of course, feel free to also connect via Twitter, Facebookand The Advanced Performance Institute.

About:
Bernard Marr is a globally recognized expert in strategy, performance management, analytics, KPIs and big data. He helps companies and executive teams manage, measure and improve performance. His latest books are ’25 Need-to-Know Key Performance Indicators’ and ‘Doing More with Less’.





Gratitude to Those Who Paid for Our Freedom

11 11 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’ve been so touched by the many Facebook posts by friends honoring dads, moms, and family members who gave courageously of their time, their health and many…their lives…to protect our freedom and for those in so many nations.

I’d like to bring a truly worthy non-profit to your attention if you’d like to donate today to help our wounded troops, Fisher House.

20141111-122506.jpgFisher House has a 4-Star 99.68% rating with Charity Navigator, and their mission is to help wounded and sick members of our military have their family come to their sides as they fight for their lives or struggle back from devastating injuries.

Please consider donating something today. You can also donate airline miles (Hero Miles) or hotel points to bring their families to them — which is such a vital part of their recovery:
https://www.fisherhouse.org/about/

As my own parents battled their own illnesses and ultimately passed away in the last few years, I know on the deepest level how important the love and physical presence of family is to those contending with serious illnesses. There is a wonderful Fisher House at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, and seeing the families there made me realize how much this younger generation of veterans need our help now.

20141111-123457.jpgMy Dad was honored to serve in WWII and he was grateful to survive to raise a family…and he remained profoundly moved by the experience. He honored his fallen friends and always had a special way of drawing out the stories, many horrific and traumatizing, from the veterans of all wars, many of whom could never talk before about their experiences.

One of his close friends, Jack Bradley, with whom he enlisted and went to boot camp, became one of the famous flag raisers of Iwo Jima in the famous photo above. Jack didn’t speak of the war, a decorated hero himself, but would only humbly say that “the real heroes died on Iwo Jima.” His son, James Bradley wrote an excellent book, which became a movie, called “Flags of Our Fathers” which is a valuable chronicle of the battle. Another remarkable story is “Unbroken” which is well worth reading before the movie comes out this Christmas.

Many generations of veterans and their families paved the way for the life and freedoms we enjoy today, and many died on foreign soil to give others a chance for freedom. I am profoundly grateful to all of them, and to their families who paid the price, and I join the rest of you in saying a deep THANK YOU.





What Matters in Doing Your Best Work

27 10 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’m sharing this blog post by Sally Thornton that offers a different way of looking at your passions versus your skills in finding your path to meaningful work.

Warmly,

Sue

What Matters in Doing Your Best Work

By Sally Thornton, CEO and Founder of Forshay

We hear it so often: Follow your passions. Do what you love and the money will follow. But then we keep listening for more specific advice and, not surprisingly, it often conflicts.

Recently, Jeffrey Katzenberg surprised a crowd by suggesting that young people follow not their dreams, but their skills: “I believe every human being does something great. Follow that thing you’re actually really good at and that may become your passion.” In the parlance of the diagram above, he’s suggesting that the joy of doing something well, something you’re suited for, can turn a job into a career.

Meanwhile, in a speech to Stanford business school students, Oprah Winfrey suggests two keys to finding your “power base,” following your instincts and connecting your skills with your values: “Align your personality with your purpose, and no one can touch you.” In the language of the diagram above: when what you do well meets what the world needs, you turn a talent into a career.

I love Oprah more than I do Disney (although with Frozen maybe I can love both). But the thing Winfrey and Katzenberg have in common here is the assumption that both success and fulfillment require that we look consciously at our lives, taking into account both practical needs and less rational – but equally crucial – issues of fulfillment.

20141027-163719.jpgSo how do we apply all this to our actual lives-in-progress?

When I talk to people about finding satisfying work, the conversation often turns to deeper issues – what they like and don’t like doing day to day, and how that syncs (or doesn’t) with the effect they want to have on the world. The question underlying these conversations is a big one: “Does what I’m working on really matter?”

I often talk with people at crossroads in their careers. So many of them have succeeded by societal standards but, in the midst of that success, they feel something is missing – call it heart or impact. They’ve been heads down, working hard for so long, and finally they realize some part of their diagram of “doing your best work” is missing. And sometimes they conclude that, to find passion or meaning in work, they must make an enormous change. Give it all up. Do something entirely different.

For some people – the ones who should have been artists, activists, explorers all along – taking such a leap is a lifesaving move. But for many more, the changes they might want to make are more subtle, more of a recalibration. I ask these people to envision ways they could use their talents not to start anew but to expand what is possible. Which of their current skills can they offer the world, and in what capacities might exercising those skills bring them fulfillment? How can they use those skills in new ways? If the company where they work isn’t aligned with their values, can they find one that is or go freelance? What aspects of their current work take them away from what they value, and how can they shift their focus to give the world what they’re made to offer?

In short, for each of us, the diagram of “doing your best work” is a work in progress, one that continues to shift across our working lives. When we start to engage with the questions it represents, we move closer to work that we feel matters.

What does your diagram look like? What shifts do you need to make? Tell us what you think – join the conversation here.

About the Author:
Sally Thornton is Founder of Forshay (www.Forshay.com). Sally has extensive experience addressing the unique talent needs of the Bay Area’s most remarkable companies, including national business leaders such as Genentech and Levi Strauss, and rapid-growth startups.





Shutterfly Recruiting Open House – Tuesday, Sept 23 in Santa Clara

18 09 2014

Hello Everyone,

Shutterfly is hosting a Job Fair on 9/23. the details are in their invitation below!

Warmly,

Sue

Shutterfly Recruiting Open House – Job Fair

Tuesday, September 23rd
5:00pm – 7:00pm

Santa Clara Marriott
2700 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054

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Shutterfly Inc. invites you to join us at our Recruiting Open House to learn more about our career opportunities!

Join us on Tuesday, September 23rd where you will have the opportunity to meet our hiring managers, employees, and recruiting team for all of the Shutterfly Inc. brands: Shutterfly, Tiny Prints, Wedding Paper Divas and Treat.

We are hiring in the following departments:

– Accounting
– Business Development
– Creative Services
– Engineering
– Finance
– Marketing
– Merchandising

For a complete list of available positions, please view our available positions here: http://www.shutterfly.com/jobs

*Please indicate which roles you may be interested in learning more about in the Cover Letter section of the application.

Before you arrive at the event, be sure to Pre-Register by applying online.

http://hire.jobvite.com/j/?cj=ooavZfwM&s=KIT_List

Be sure to take a look at our Available Positions to see if there is a job that matches your interests and experience (http://www.shutterfly.com/about/positions.jsp?esch=1).

This is a great opportunity to learn more about Shutterfly Inc. and meet our wonderful teams.

Please feel free to share this invite with others that you would like to join the event. All are welcome!

We hope to see you at the event on Tuesday, September 23rd at the Santa Clara Marriott!





Our SGI Reunion is this Monday, 9/22, in Palo Alto! Please RSVP.

18 09 2014

Hello Everyone,

For those of you who know the story of the KIT List, it started as my personal “Keep in Touch” (the meaning of the KIT name!) email list of my friends at Silicon Graphics. It grew simply by word-of-mouth to what I jokingly call 71,000 of my closest friends!

But for those of you who are present and last SGI employees or consultants (like me!), I wanted to make sure you knew about this year’s SGI reunion I’m organizing.

20140918-112834.jpg
Here are the details:

SGI Reunion
Monday, Sept. 22
The Patio
412 Emerson, Palo Alto
5:30 – 9:00

Please RSVP via the Evite at:
http://www.evite.com/event/020CXOF6IQI7M4WTSEPEGRT2ZVCOAU

It’s no-host, so it’s free to attend and you just buy your own drinks and food — or you can be a hero and buy some friends a drink!

We’ll be meeting on the back patio…and the weather is promising to be warm and balmy that evening.

Please pass the word to other SGIers so we don’t miss anyone!

I’m sorry, but this is for SGI folks only, though I will organize a KIT List networking event at another time. I’m just rushing to get this in while the weather is good!

Take care, everyone,

Sue








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