1/17 Networking Event: Using Social to Land Your Job from a LinkedIn Expert

14 01 2017

Hi Everyone,

I heard Oscar Garcia, former Community manager at LinkedIn, speak at the Santa Clara Library a few months ago and was very impressed with his tips and strategies which he shared. I learned things I didn’t know about! I’m going to this event, too!

The Santa Clara Library is hosting another event with Oscar — combined with a networking opportunity to put your social skills to work in a comfortable and in-person environment.

Kick off the new year with some effective and positive networking — and land your dream job.

Here’s to a very special 2017 for all you!

– Sue

 
Networking 101: Socializing to Get Your Next Job (Free Event)

Tue, January 17, 2017
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM PST (networking after)

Santa Clara Library – Northside Branch
695 Moreland Way
Santa Clara, CA 95054

Register (space is limited):
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/networking-101-socializing-to-get-your-next-job-tickets-30599289298?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&utm-source=strongmail&utm-term=listing

Most people are finding their next job opportunities or promotions through their network. Gone are the days of sending in your resume through the computer. It is not about “what you know” as much as “who you know” that could get your next job.

Learn from Oscar Garcia, CEO of Aspira (and former Community Manager at LinkedIn) on how to cultivate and maintain a thriving network to find our next opportunity.

Then following Oscar’s presentation, there will be a networking after-party at Yan Can Asian Bistro in Rivermark where you can work on your socializing and networking skills (it’s just across the street!).

This program is sponsored by the Santa Clara City Library Foundation and Friends.





SGI reunion on 9/26!

7 09 2016

Hi Everyone,

You may already know that the genesis of the KIT List was my personal “keep in touch” email list of my friends at Silicon Graphics.

Many SGIers are still on this list as they’ve moved to other companies. In fact, they’re the whole reason the KIT List turned from my personal email list to a job opportunities email list. It grew just by word-of-mouth to what I jokingly call “72,000 of my closest friends!”
I’d like to make sure we reach all SGI folks (employees and consultants like me!) so they know about this year’s reunion.

I’m sorry! This is not a KIT List event, it’s just for SGI present and past employees, consultants and contractors. However, I am hosting a KIT List networking event on another date, though, on 10/3 (also at The Patio)! Stay tuned for a blog post shortly with the details. 

Monday, 9/26
The Patio
412 Emerson
Palo Alto
5:30 – 9:30 PM

Please RSVP so The Patio can staff up for the night:

http://www.evite.com/event/020CHUTBXNQTQE4DCEPGNMNQVNY7JI

Also, please help me by passing the word to other SGI folks so we don’t miss anyone!

See you on the 26th!

Sue





Job Seekers’ Seminar on “Creating Your Great Elevator Pitch” on 12/3

13 11 2015

Hello Everyone,

There is a great Job Seekers’ seminar coming up on Thursday, December 3, 2015.

This seminar is sponsored by CSIX Connect, which is a terrrific job search and networking group for which I have a lot of admiration. CSIX’s founder, Hamid Saadat, was kind enough to share his job search expertise with the KIT List community on one of the TV programs I hosted, called “Get That Job!” If you’d like to see the YouTube video of the show, and hear Hamid’s sage advice along with another HR hiring expert, Tom Brouchoud, Head of Talent Acquisition at EMC and former Director of Global Talent at Sandisk. You can watch it at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHSlVMUbNuE

Please pass this information on to other friends who want to create an effective Elevator Pitch that will attract the right job to them!

Warmly,

Sue

CSIX logo
Job Seekers’ Seminar

Your Elevator Pitch: Making Your ’30-second Commercial’ Really Work for You!
Thursday, December 3, 2015
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Saratoga Federated Church
Richards Hall, located at 20390 Park Place
Saratoga, CA 95070

The cost to attend this meeting is $10 — cash only, no checks or credit cards. The fee covers program, lunch, tax, and tip.

RSVP at the CSIX Meetup site:
http://www.meetup.com/CSIX-Connect/events/226029593/

Dee Marik

Delores Marik Ph.D.

The Job Seekers’ seminar will be part of CSIX Connect’s regular weekly meeting. It will be presented by another great friend of mine, Delores (Dee) Marik Ph.D., with whom I had the pleasure of working when I was consulting at Hewlett-Packard. Dee now has her own coaching practice — and I can tell you from personal experience how great she is in career coaching and resume advice since she gave me excellent feedback on my own resume! You can find out more about Dee and her coaching work at https://www.linkedin.com/in/marik

This seminar will focus on your Elevator Pitch, also known as “Your 30-second commercial.” Dee will discuss what an elevator pitch is, why you need one, and when you should use it, and how to make it work best. Plus, there will be an opportunity for you to create and practice your elevator pitch during the meeting.

The CSIX weekly meeting agenda is as follows:

10:00 – 10:30   Arrival of attendees, check-in, open networking
10:30 – 10:40
   Meeting starts, new member introductions
10:40 – 10:55
   Job leads, contact requests, announcements, etc.
10:55 – 11:10
   Open networking
11:10 – 12:00
   Speaker presentation
12:00 – 1:00
     Lunch and table networking

CSIX Connect is a Silicon Valley job searchers’ networking and support group that meets every Thursday at 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM.  If you are actively looking for a job, it’s a smart idea to join them on a regular basis!

For further information about CSIX Connect, including information about parking restrictions and future programs, please visit http://www.csix.org.





It’s Worth it to Reply to Job Postings!

15 10 2015

The phrase Go For It in red text on a yellow sticky note posted on a green notice boardHi Everyone,

You don’t see the emails we get from people who’ve landed jobs from the KIT List, so I want to encourage you to keep up your efforts. It really is WORTH it!

In fact, with the new KIT List web site that’s in final development, I’ll have a Testimonials section where you can read quotes from our KIT List recruiters and employers who’ve hired great people — and from job seekers who’ve landed jobs that will help keep you inspired!

I know it can be discouraging when you’re in the job-search mode. I also hear many job seekers worry that their resumes go into a black hole when they reply to jobs on the web. On the big sites, that can be true.

With the KIT List, there’s a big difference:

  • Your email goes directly to the recruiter or hiring person who posted the job.
  • Since we purposely don’t market the KIT List, the people on the KIT List have been referred by another friend or colleague. This has kept the quality of the people on the list high as top people refer other talented people.
  • Since we’re smaller than the huge job boards, you’re not one of hundreds replying to a job and getting sorted via a software screening program, so your response will be seen by a real person.

For that reason, it’s also important to take the time to write even a brief cover note when you reply to a KIT List job.

Don’t Overlook the Power of a Good Cover Letter

Over the years, I’ve seen people blow their chance to make a good impression either by not including a cover note at all, or by writing the following:

  • “Is this job still open?” Of course it is, they just posted it!
  • “What’s the rate (or salary)?” Please don’t do that! Instead, show your interest and value to them first. Save the salary query until the interview, and better yet, let them bring it up!
  • “Here’s my resume”

Tips for Your Cover Letter

I’ve talked to many recruiters over the years, and even had them as panelists at KIT List events and on the KIT List TV Show. Some recruiters don’t really look at cover letters, but you’d be surprised that so many actually do! Don’t run the risk of getting weeded out by not having a cover letter when it’s a recruiter or hiring manager who DOES care about a cover letter.

Your cover letter can be brief, but these are a few things that you should include:

  • Something stating your interest in the role
  •  The actual job title since they are likely hiring for multiple roles
  • A few bullets from your experience that pertain to the key requirements listed in the job description
  • Make sure you do not have any typos or grammatical errors
  • Include a nice closing statement
  • Your name and a good number to reach you

Avoid These Other Common Mistakes

It’s also a mistake is to reply to a job for which you are not remotely a fit. You don’t have to be a perfect match with all the requirements, but some people get a bad reputation for replying to just any job. Stay on focus and you’ll be a stronger candidate.

Another mistake is that you get put off by a long list of requirements and you don’t feel like you’re an exact fit. Job descriptions can be unintentionally misleading if it’s been cut and pasted from many other job posts, or if the person writing it didn’t research it well with the hiring manager. I’ve asked recruiters and they said that if you’re a 75% to 80% match with the job requirements to GO FOR IT! Don’t disqualify yourself prematurely.

Don’t get disheartened during the job search process. You never know what effort will be the one that will connect you with the right job. Keep at it, make a great impression with a good cover letter, and we hope you find a job you love soon!





Meeting this Saturday: “Getting a Job in the Digital Age: The Anti-Advice Talk” by Noted Anthropologist

12 05 2015

Hi Everyone,

There’s a great event coming up this Saturday by our friends with the Career Actions Network, which is a remarkable organization through MPPC (Menlo Park Presbyterian Church), that provides free services to help get people connected into jobs.

Presented by an anthropologist, Ilana Gershon, who was a visiting professor at Stanford, this is relevant information to those who want to change jobs (not only people who lost their jobs, but also the employed 50% who want to change jobs).

As a visiting professor at Stanford, Ilana spent last year researching job transition in Silicon Valley. She collaborated with the Career Actions Network while she was doing her research, and she is currently on their Advisory Board.

This is worth attending. Pass
the word and bring a friend!

Warmly,

Sue

20150512-162059.jpg
MPPC Career Actions Meeting 5/16:
“Getting a Job in the Digital Age: The Anti-Advice Talk” by Noted Anthropologist

New Attendees pre-register here (its free): www.careeractions.org

Saturday, May 16

ODCMV Fellowship Hall at 1667 Miramonte Ave., Mountain View, CA

Agenda:

9:30am: Coffee/networking

9:55am Topic: Getting a Job in the Digital Age: The Anti-Advice Talk

Guest Speaker: Ilana Gershon

About the presentation:

What do you need to do to get a job in this digital age? Do you need a LinkedIn profile? Are hiring managers looking for your personal brand? Ilana Gershon is an anthropology professor at Indiana University who thought asking job seekers, hiring managers, recruiters and HR how hiring works might shed some insights into what is actually going on in contemporary US as hiring and the nature of work changes. She did a year of fieldwork in the Bay Area, trying to figure out what has changed about hiring since the 1980s. Find out what an anthropologist has to say about hiring these days.

About the speaker:

Ilana Gershon is a cultural anthropologist at Indiana University interested in how new media transforms highly-charged social tasks, such as breaking up or hiring in the United States. She has written about how people use new media to end romantic relationships in The Breakup 2.0: Disconnecting over New Media. Her current research addresses how new media shapes hiring in post-recession U.S. companies.

In May or June, she will have a new edited collection of imagined career advice for real jobs around the world. If you want to know how to be a professional wrestler in Mexico or a magician in Paris, pick up a copy of A World of Work: Imagined Manuals for Real Jobs (Cornell University Press, 2015).





10 F’s for a Fabulous ’15

8 01 2015

I have to confess that I’m not big on New Year’s resolutions, in fact I kind of stink at them! I’ve started some years with great intentions (usually too long a list!) that didn’t last long…or I gave up entirely and didn’t make ANY resolutions. Hey, then there’s nothing to break!

But I’m approaching this year differently. I’m just going to choose ONE thing on which I’m going to focus, and really give it my best. It doesn’t mean I won’t be working on other things, but keeping it simple and keeping to one big commitment more likely to stick.

I also am also giving this new year the theme “Fabulous ’15” as the motto for this fresh, opportunity-filled year.

20150108-185811.jpg
My wish is that you also have a Fabulous ’15 — and that this is a very special year for you in which new experiences, people, opportunities and adventures come to you and your families.

When I thought of the “Fabulous” theme, other words starting with F (OK, just the clean words!) came to mind.

Take a look at some of these ideas and see which one resonates most with you for your own focus to make this a fabulous year:

1. Fight

Stand up and be counted for a good cause. This is not a call to arms, but an idea to shift our energy off our own goals and challenges and to dedicate it to protecting or advocating for others or for your community. I love the lyrics from Don Quixote’s song in “Man of La Mancha,” “To dream the impossible dream…to right the unrightable wrong.” The full lyrics are here.

There are so many needs out there, it can be overwhelming. Yet if all of us choose just one special cause, person or issue in which to some extra time, we can really change the world!

2. Fearlessness

I’m striving myself to not let fears, real or imagined, hold me back. The old adage, “Feel the fear and do it anyway” is the way I’m choosing to go. For high performers in this valley, the fear of failure often thwarts innovation and new directions.

I’m resolving to be more audacious in my goals and dreams. To embrace risk in a positive way and push myself out of my own comfort zone. When we think of the amazing things that are accomplished, it’s often on the heels of what seemed like failure. I’m encouraged by the famous failures-turned-success of Edison, Churchill, Disney and Lincoln. This article profiles just a few who risked failure time after time — which led to remarkable achievements that changed the world for each of us.

Where can you rush in where only fools dare to go? Let’s go forward boldly and dream audaciously!

3. Finish

Is there anything that has been on your life or “To Do” list that you’ve been meaning to get around to but it still languishes? How about dedicating some special effort into finally wrapping up that item or action so you won’t be haunted by it — and feel a sense of accomplishment instead? After struggling to revamp the KIT List web site, the new site is almost ready. I will feel SUCH relief when it’s done! Stay tuned for news about the new, more robust site being up!

4. Faith
No matter where we are in our spiritual walk, there’s always room to grow more deeply in our faith, and to work on our own rough edges that life, family, friends and experiences help to smooth.

In these recent years when I’ve said goodbye to loving parents, close friends and people who’ve inspired and touched me, my faith has given me the strength to face the tough stuff, envelop me in grace to see the meaning in the difficult times and to see how there is a gift and blessing that comes from even the hardest things.

I’ve also been deeply grateful to friends who’ve been there for me, and I hope I’ve been there for them in their own challenging times. Illness, death, and hardships come with being a participant on this Earth — and faith and friends give context, meaning and hope to not only endure but to ultimately flourish and grow into a better person as a result.

5. Foundation

Is there something you’ve been wanting to do to build or strengthen for your future? A new skill to enhance your career marketability — or just to learn something that has always interested you? Better financial planning?

I’m an excellent procrastinator for many things on my life “To Do” List. I’ve found that what has really helped me is to have a success team of friends that you meet with monthly (and even do mid-month check-in calls) to help you keep on track and provide what I call “gentle accountability.” It’s good to keep the group small with 4 – 6 people who will commit to each other and to meet regularly. I’ve had various groups over the years who’ve been an incredible help in my setting and reaching short-term and long-term (still in process!) goals. It’s so wonderful to help and encourage your fellow group members and to see the large and small things accomplished. How about starting a group of your own?

Also, my sister, Kelly Connelly (and co-moderator of the KIT List) has found Michael Hyatt http://michaelhyatt.com/ to be an excellent resource for free tips, webinars and podcasts on how to really accomplish the things you want in your career and life. He’s upbeat, interesting and highly informative. It’s worth checking out his resources and get things really moving for yourself. Listen to a podcast while driving and get motivated!

6. Forgiveness

This is an opportunity for grace. Are there things you need to forgive in yourself, or in others, that will free you for better things? The greatest part about the remarkable story of Louis Zamperini in the book and recent movie, “Unbroken,” is not just his courage and resilience, but his freedom when he ultimately forgave his captor and persecutor in the Japanese prison camp where he was the special target of abuse and torture. Forgiveness through faith ended up freeing him from PTSD and alcoholism — which saved his marriage and restored his life and family.

Another favorite book is “The Hiding Place” by Corrie ten Boom, who hid and saved over 800 Jews during World War II, but was ultimately captured and sent to the notorious Ravensbruck concentration camp. Her sister died there, and Corrie experienced much suffering while trying to help and inspire faith and hope among fellow prisoners. But she, too, was able to forgive a brutal guard, and the entire nation, and she spent time after the war helping to heal and rebuild people in shattered Germany. Corrie dedicated the rest of her life as a “Tramp for The Lord” (the title of her 2nd book) traveling the world to share the story of redemption, love and forgiveness.

7. Fitness
This is that time of year that we all start with renewed zeal for exercise and health. I don’t happen to one who loves this naturally, so I have to find ways to make it fresh, fun and more enjoyable. I’ve found it a HUGE help to have workout buddies. I’ll get my reluctant tail to the gym or out on a bike ride when I’ve made a commitment to someone else.

Thank you to my friends and family over the years who have been great fitness buddies. I may not like working out, but you make it much more enjoyable! Is there someone who can help you try a new sport or new routine?

8. Friends and Family
It goes without saying how important family and friends are in enriching our lives. We all know that time is precious and fleeting. No matter what our age, health and just being alive can’t be taken for granted. Work and other commitments make far greater demands on our time in this era. What are ways you can build in more device-free time with those you love and experience new things together?

During this holiday season, my family and friends actually spent time doing old-tech games like Charades and Taboo (pretty hilarious). We also did hikes and bike rides, cookie baking/decorating, going to the beach (the source of this blog’s photo! Carmel was beautiful and we saw a large pod of dolphins frolicking in the waves. What a delight!) and other relaxing things that were just a great way to spend time together.

Slowing down and finding new ways to enjoy time together will reap many rewards in our over-programmed society. Also, is there a way to add new and interesting people into your circle of friends? They can open up new horizons and experiences for you, too.

9. Farewells

People, habits, jobs…it’s hard to accept that change is a natural and important part of life. Sometimes we have to say goodbye to loved ones who’ve died, or to jobs that no longer fit us, or to habits that don’t serve us any longer. I’m learning to embrace change more (it’s a challenge for me!). Instead, I’m looking to find ways to try to get ahead of the change curve (what new trends, learning, skills, talents will be tapped?). I realize that while nothing really ever stays the same, how can I make change work to the positive — and mitigate any possible negative impacts proactively?

10. Fun!
In the midst of the hectic pace and overbooked lives so many of us face, let’s be sure to allow ourselves time for pure FUN — with family, friends and new people. Now that even kids’ sports have become so competitive and stressful, we’ve lost the element of fun, learning, exploring, making mistakes and bumping into new and unexpected things! We need free time for true “re-creation.” Unstructured time without electronic devices allows for better ways to tap into our creativity. A good laugh, or even a smile, releases endorphins into our bodies. When was the last time you allowed yourself to just have fun?

I know, this is a long list, but just choose ONE thing to differently.

You’re more likely to be able to stick to it for the long run this year. Keep it simple and avoid the temptation to have a long laundry list of resolutions. Choose one theme on which to focus and REALLY make a difference that you can appreciate and be proud of at the end of this bright, new year! I’m going to do the same.

If you’d like to share your own ideas or themes for the New Year, please add your comment below!

Kelly, Amy and I wish you a FABULOUS 2015 ahead!

Warmly,

Your KIT List Team:
Sue and Kelly Connelly, and Amy Plunkett





Gratitude to Those Who Paid for Our Freedom

11 11 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’ve been so touched by the many Facebook posts by friends honoring dads, moms, and family members who gave courageously of their time, their health and many…their lives…to protect our freedom and for those in so many nations.

I’d like to bring a truly worthy non-profit to your attention if you’d like to donate today to help our wounded troops, Fisher House.

20141111-122506.jpgFisher House has a 4-Star 99.68% rating with Charity Navigator, and their mission is to help wounded and sick members of our military have their family come to their sides as they fight for their lives or struggle back from devastating injuries.

Please consider donating something today. You can also donate airline miles (Hero Miles) or hotel points to bring their families to them — which is such a vital part of their recovery:
https://www.fisherhouse.org/about/

As my own parents battled their own illnesses and ultimately passed away in the last few years, I know on the deepest level how important the love and physical presence of family is to those contending with serious illnesses. There is a wonderful Fisher House at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, and seeing the families there made me realize how much this younger generation of veterans need our help now.

20141111-123457.jpgMy Dad was honored to serve in WWII and he was grateful to survive to raise a family…and he remained profoundly moved by the experience. He honored his fallen friends and always had a special way of drawing out the stories, many horrific and traumatizing, from the veterans of all wars, many of whom could never talk before about their experiences.

One of his close friends, Jack Bradley, with whom he enlisted and went to boot camp, became one of the famous flag raisers of Iwo Jima in the famous photo above. Jack didn’t speak of the war, a decorated hero himself, but would only humbly say that “the real heroes died on Iwo Jima.” His son, James Bradley wrote an excellent book, which became a movie, called “Flags of Our Fathers” which is a valuable chronicle of the battle. Another remarkable story is “Unbroken” which is well worth reading before the movie comes out this Christmas.

Many generations of veterans and their families paved the way for the life and freedoms we enjoy today, and many died on foreign soil to give others a chance for freedom. I am profoundly grateful to all of them, and to their families who paid the price, and I join the rest of you in saying a deep THANK YOU.