Come to our “Ask the Recruiter” Expert Panel Event on 7/25!

12 07 2017

Hi Everyone,

Have you ever had a question that you were just dying to ask an employer or recruiter about the hiring process, how to land the right job, or how to get a promotion? 


Now, you’ll have a chance to hear directly from the hiring experts their smartest tips, the mistakes to avoid, and the inside scoop from the employer/recruiter standpoint!

The KIT List is hosting this free event, and I will moderate a panel of five experts from some of the Silicon Valley’s top recruitment firms for permanent, temp-to-perm and contract placements. We’ll have a combination of prepared questions and Q&A from the audience. 

Our panel will share their expert advice from working with companies including Facebook, Apple, LinkedIn, Nike, HP, Cisco, Microsoft, VMWare, Intuit, NetApp, Adobe, Stanford Health Care, Bank of the West, Wells Fargo, Kaiser, Blue Shield, Safeway, Varian Medical Systems, Brocade, and Gigamon, to name a few.

Join us at the beautiful Northside Branch of the Santa Clara Library in their large events room.

There is a space limit of 100 so please register for this free event, and be sure to arrive early to get a seat since this will be standing room only (if you can’t get in, then join us for the free mixer afterward). 

Tuesday, 7/25
7:00 – 8:30 PM  

Northside Branch Library
695 Moreland Way
Santa Clara CA 

There is no charge, but please register and arrive early: https://nskitlistpanel.eventbrite.com


Post-Event Mixer:
8:30 – 9:30 PM at 
Yan Can Asian Bistro (Across the street from the Library) 
The mixer is free; just pay for your own food and drinks. Some of the panelists will join us as well. 

This is a special opportunity to ask the questions you’ve always wanted to ask — and to get beyond the basics!

You are welcome to share this invitation with friends and colleagues, too. 

We hope to see you there!

Sue and Kelly Connelly 
(Yep, we’re sisters!) 
Your KIT List Team






“How to Get the Job When You Don’t Have the Experience” on LinkedIn

18 08 2014

Hello Everyone,

I saw this great article on my LinkedIn feed last week, and James Citrin makes some really good points on what to do if you are a recent graduate — or an experienced professional who wants to pursue new a career direction or go after your passion.

Now, I encourage you to go out and GO FOR IT and find a job you’ll love!

Warmly,

Sue

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How to Get the Job When You Don’t Have the Experience
By James Citrin (posted on LinkedIn)

 

“The Permission Paradox” – You can’t get the job without the experience but you can’t get the experience without the job – is one of the great career Catch-22s. This challenge will confront you over the lifetime of your career, whether you’re trying to break into the work force or you’re to become a CEO for the first time. While the phenomenon can be frustrating no matter what your level, the Permission Paradox is especially challenging for today’s aspiring young professional and recent graduates.

Overcoming this conundrum is fundamental both to launching your career successfully and thriving over the long term. You are confident in your abilities if only you’re given the chance. The hard part is getting the shot to show what you can do.

Go to the full article to get the Five Permission Strategies:
https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140811235043-203184238-how-to-overcome-the-permission-paradox-you-can-t-get-the-job-without-the-experience-but-you-can-t-get-the-experience-without-the-job

 





Some spots open for ProMatch career services this Weds. 6/25 and Weds. 7/2

19 06 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’ve received rave reviews from KIT List members about ProMatch, a free service from the California EDD, that has many features to help professionals with career growth.

ProMatch has some openings for its orientations this Wednesday and next, 6/25 and 7/2.

Please show up on time since it’s a first-come, first-served basis.

ProMatch is impressive and many of our KIT List members vouch for how the program focuses professionals on getting back into great jobs.

ProMatch is offered at no charge — it is part of America’s Job Center of California collaboration between the state’s EDD Experience Unlimited program and the NOVA Workforce Investment Board.

I encourage you to attend the Wednesday orientation and benefit from ProMatch’s excellent array of tools, workshops, success teams, professional career coaches and speakers to help you conduct a smarter job search.

Warmly,

Sue

*****************
ProMatch Career Resource Center

You are a professional. You realize that you need to be on the inside track to land the next job in your career.

But to tap the hidden jobs, you need support. The kind you get from a strong network.

When you join ProMatch, you get all the networking support you need at no charge:

– Professional networking opportunities to tap into the hidden job market

– Small group success teams who hold you accountable and support you in your search

– Workshops where you hone your resume, practiceyour interviewing and grow your network

– No-fee sessions with professional career coaches and guest speakers waive their high fees for you

Get started at one of these ProMatch orientations:

Wednesdays
8:15 to 11am

No reservation needed. Just show up (on time!) at:
ProMatch Career Resource Center
505 W. Olive Ave. Suite 737
Sunnyvale, CA 94086
http://www.promatch.org
Phone: (408) 730-7671





Free training for PMP (Project Management Professional) certification in San Franciso

29 04 2014

Hi Everyone,

Someone from the KIT List was kind enough to send this information to me about an opportunity for job seekers to get the much-valued PMP certification…free of charge.

NOTE: If you know of other free or close-to-free job search or career develoment resources, please let me know and I’ll post it on the KIT Resources email list. If you’re not already subscribed to it, you can join by sending an email to KITlistResource-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

Please go to the links below to find out more about the PMP program — you do need to qualify for the funding, but the site will help you through the process.

One of the smart things to do when you’re out of work is to increase your value by building new skills. A PMP certification has long been recognized as an important accreditation.

Also, there are other great training programs through TechSF (http://www.bavc.org/techsf), so be sure to go to their site to find out more about their other services to job seekers!

Warmly,

Sue

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Register for TechSF & get funded to train in Project Management!

Project Management Bootcamp

https://bavc.org/project-management-bootcamp-may-12th-july-31

This intensive evening training beginning May 12th and finishing July 31st will target preparing students for the industry standard certification exam (PMP), as well as cover the following topics: project management theory of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and closing projects; using Microsoft Project software; career assessments, workshops, and counseling.

Prerequisites: a secondary or four-year degree; demonstrable project management experience

Find more information at bavc.org/tech-sf

Register for TechSF to get started!

Questions?
Contact natalie@bavc.org





5 Ways to Ask for a Referral

31 10 2013

Asking for referrals and introductions makes most of us uncomfortable. But think about it. If you’ve had a great experience working with someone, it’s really satisfying to refer that person to a friend or colleague. It’s even more rewarding when your colleague, too, finds value and thanks you for having made the connection.
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So how do you ask for a referral without being pushy or sounding desperate?

First, it’s helpful acknowledge your appreciation for the referrer. Something like: “You know, Joe, I really enjoy our work together. In particular, I appreciate the way you rally the troops to tackle big challenges…”

Then follow with “the ask.” The key is to ask in a way that encourages them to think of a specific person and give you specific name. Here are five ways to ask.

1. The Basic:
Who do you know that should know about me?

2. The Acknowledgement:
Who do you know who, like you, [compliment, aspiration]? Example: “Who do you know who, like you, has built a successful, fast-growing company and might need someone like me to…?”

3. The Challenge:
“When we first started working together you were experiencing [problem]. Who do you know that has a similar challenge who may want to meet me and learn more about how to achieve similar results?”

4. Curiosity:
“Who do you know who may be curious about the type of customized training program we’ve designed for you?”

5. The Breakthrough:
“You really achieved a significant breakthrough recently when we worked together on [project]. Who do you know who may seek a similar breakthrough?”

The next step is to ask them if they would be willing to make an introduction via email or phone. When they say yes, make it really easy for them. Send a brief one-paragraph introduction that highlights the types of problems you solve and results you deliver.

Before the introduction, be sure to ask the referrer what you should know about that person. Any information you can glean to help “break the ice” in your first call will result in more rapid rapport, and a higher probability of success.

What have you found works best to seek referrals from your colleagues and satisfied clients?

Share your ideas or experiences in the Comments section of this blog.

About the Author:

Kate Purmal is COO of an early stage stealth cell therapy company. She also serves as a consultant, advisor and business coach to CEOs, executives, and entrepreneurs. Previously Kate served as a Senior Vice President at SanDisk, the CEO of the software joint venture U3, and led the product team that designed and launched the PalmPilot.
www.katepurmal.com

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Introducing the Career Actions Network. Next meeting is November 2nd.

29 10 2013

Hello Everyone,

I was on a speaker panel recently with Al Hulvey, one of the heads of the Career Actions Network, which is a very effective and free service that is being offered by Menlo Park Presbyterian Church (MPPC).

The church has an excellent program of meetings with expert speakers on job search strategies, plus small accountability groups, and a résumé and referral network.

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You can sign up on their network now — and I also encourage you to attend their next Large Group meeting on 11/2/13 with the topic, “Hire Yourself an Employer.”

See the end of this email for the topic and speaker info.

Here’s their link:

http://mppc.org/connect/information-job-seekers

These are the key actions you can take to access their great (and free!) resources:

1. Attend a Large Group Meeting.

When: On the 1st and 3rd Saturdays
9:30 to 11 a.m. at MPPC’s Fellowship Hall
1667 Miramonte Ave., Mountain View, CA

The aim of the large group meeting is to provide practical training on job search skills and networking. This large group setting offers:

– Presentations by experts to help you improve your job search
– Networking with a broad cross-section of professional disciplines
– Resume review with instant feedback
– Opportunities to join a Success Team and participate in our Job Referral Network

2. Join a Success Team.
CAM (Career Action Ministry) offers on-going small group support and encouragement through weekly Success Team meetings. These groups of 5-10 job seekers provide:

– A regular meeting structure that avoids isolation
– A forum for sharing ideas, contacts, and job leads
– A sympathetic group to practice interviewing techniques or other job search skills
– A trusted team to share individual problems for referral to other MPPC ministries or community resources.

3. Become part of the web-based Career Actions Network.
A unique feature of the CAM program is our job referral network. Members of the congregation have opted in to provide job leads and referrals. Register to create a profile and post your resume.

The next Large Group meeting:

Saturday, November 2
Guest Speaker: Dennis Romley
Presentation Topic: Hire Yourself an Employer

About the Presentation:
Go Hire Yourself An Employer (originally a book title by Richard Irish) is a powerful concept and the theme for Dennis Romley’s talk. Dennis will dissect the job search process and zero in on getting the interview. He offers concrete advice on how to nail each interview. Key is what Dennis calls the “ladder to success” which will translate personally to each one of us regarding our process of searching for a job. Participants will leave this discussion with an awareness of our choices in getting more of what we want in each situation as well as great materials for preparing and interviewing powerfully.

About the Speaker:
Dennis Romley is the founder and principal of Threshold Consulting, a firm dedicated to organizational change & development and strategic management of human capital. Recent assignments include: transition consulting and career coaching for Career Curve clients, design and delivery of Collaboration and Ideation workshops for product conception and improvement, and talent retention strategies for an organization under fire.

Dennis applies his skills as a strong negotiator, compassionate leader and team collaborator to produce the results needed when he is called in to support organizational change. He has over 30 years experience in strategic and global roles that include Senior Vice President at Roche Pharmaceuticals, Vice President SRI International/SRI Consulting and Director at Raychem Corporation (now Tyco). Dennis is a mentor and coach with senior leaders to encourage positive team and organizational dynamics. With global leadership and training experience in the USA, UK, Switzerland and Japan, Dennis is able to apply best practices across cultures and teams.

Warmly,

Sue





“4 Ways to Write LinkedIn Messages That Actually Get Read”

23 10 2013

Hello Everyone,

I saw this article on Mashable.com and this captures the tips I’ve been wanting to share with the KIT List.

I get those auto-invitations to connect on LinkedIn all the time, but I don’t accept them unless I already know the person. However, the exception is when someone takes the time to write a personal note.

Taking a quick minute to write a personal note instead of using the form letter is well worth it. It creates context for why someone should connect with you. As the article mentions, just using the auto form is not a good practice and dramatically lowers your chance of being read.

Here’s the link to the article:
(www.http://mashable.com/2013/10/14/linkedin-message-tips/) and I’ve also included the full text below.

These are important points!

Warmly,

Sue

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4 Ways to Write LinkedIn Messages That Actually Get Read

By Sarah McCord for the Daily Muse

Imagine you were at a networking event, and you spot someone you don’t know but would love to. Maybe she has your dream job, or maybe he runs a great business that you’d like to model yours after.

Would you ever walk up to this person and blurt out a question or request for his or her time, sans context, gratitude or even introductions?

Probably not — but it happens all the time on LinkedIn.

The amazing thing about LinkedIn is that it allows you to connect one-on-one with nearly anyone in the world. But I can’t tell you how many people I see squandering this opportunity by sending brief or automated messages that don’t give people any meaningful reason to connect — à la “Can you help me?” or “I’d like to connect with you on LinkedIn.” It’s lazy, it’s unprofessional, and it’s highly unlikely to get a response.

Spend a few more minutes crafting a personalized note, and you’re much more likely to make the connections you’re looking for. Try these four steps to writing a LinkedIn message that will get opened:

Step 1: Start with a Specific Title

Before you write the message, ask yourself: How do I know this person, and why am I reaching out to him or her? Is this someone you know and need advice from? Someone you share a contact with and want to know more about? A stranger with whom you’re hoping to connect for the first time?

Use that information, then, to craft as specific a subject line as possible: “Following Up from Last Night’s Event” is more likely to be read than “Following Up.” “Fellow Teacher Interested in Urban Education Reform” is better than “Loved Your Speech.” “Mutual Contact?” Don’t even think about it.

Earlier this year, I used LinkedIn InMail to ask a total stranger for professional advice. I knew that titling my message “Hello” would be a waste of a first impression, so I went with “Fellow Daily Muse Contributor Seeking Advice.”

Step 2: Introduce Yourself

When you see someone you don’t know well but are hoping to speak with, you usually give him or her a one sentence background: “I’m Sara — we met at the 10th anniversary event” or “I’m Sara, and I loved your latest blog on climate change.”

Don’t skip this step on LinkedIn. You should never assume your contact will just click on over to your profile to learn about you or see how you’re connected — be proactive (and respectful of the other person’s time) and write a quick intro.

The first paragraph of my InMail, for example, read, “My name is Sara McCord and I am a fellow contributing writer for The Daily Muse. I very much enjoyed [the latest piece she had written].”

Whether you use this sentence to include your mutual contact, where you’ve met or your shared background, tailoring your intro for the specific contact shows that you’re serious about connecting with him or her.

Step 3: Get to Why You’re Writing — and Fast

When it comes to emails, the shorter, the better. People are time-crunched, and you can lose their interest just as quickly as you got it if you segue from a pithy intro into a drawn-out monologue of why you should be connected or a lengthy recitation of your resume.

Keep this in mind as you craft your second paragraph, the meat of your message. Quickly dive into why you’re writing — and “just to be connected” doesn’t count. Why do you want to be connected? Do you love this person’s updates or products? Do you want to book him to speak at an event or invite her to guest post on your site? Do you want to ask this person questions about her company or background?

Let that topic sentence guide a paragraph (only one!) where you get into a few details: e.g., “I’m reaching out because I need advice. I’m in the midst of _______ and have some questions about ______.”

An important note, though: Make sure your ask is commensurate with your relationship. There’s a big difference between asking someone you don’t know if she’d be willing to spend 10 minutes on the phone with you talking about the interview process at her company and asking her to put in a good word for you with the CEO.

Step 4: Wrap it Up and Say Thank You

The last two lines of the message are your closing moment — think the “I look forward to hearing from you” at the end of the interview. You want to be gracious, but also make sure it’s clear what you’re asking for.

Try this: “All this to say, might you have time to [provide feedback, write a recommendation, make an introduction, whatever]? I greatly appreciate your time and expertise.” Remember, you’re asking a favor of someone you presumably don’t know well enough to call or email, so this thank-you is crucial.

These same strategies work if you’re requesting to add someone on LinkedIn — just shorten up the wording in each step. It takes just a couple minutes more than sending that automatic message, and it’s much more likely to get results.

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