Come to our “Ask the Recruiter” Expert Panel Event on 7/25!

12 07 2017

Hi Everyone,

Have you ever had a question that you were just dying to ask an employer or recruiter about the hiring process, how to land the right job, or how to get a promotion? 


Now, you’ll have a chance to hear directly from the hiring experts their smartest tips, the mistakes to avoid, and the inside scoop from the employer/recruiter standpoint!

The KIT List is hosting this free event, and I will moderate a panel of five experts from some of the Silicon Valley’s top recruitment firms for permanent, temp-to-perm and contract placements. We’ll have a combination of prepared questions and Q&A from the audience. 

Our panel will share their expert advice from working with companies including Facebook, Apple, LinkedIn, Nike, HP, Cisco, Microsoft, VMWare, Intuit, NetApp, Adobe, Stanford Health Care, Bank of the West, Wells Fargo, Kaiser, Blue Shield, Safeway, Varian Medical Systems, Brocade, and Gigamon, to name a few.

Join us at the beautiful Northside Branch of the Santa Clara Library in their large events room.

There is a space limit of 100 so please register for this free event, and be sure to arrive early to get a seat since this will be standing room only (if you can’t get in, then join us for the free mixer afterward). 

Tuesday, 7/25
7:00 – 8:30 PM  

Northside Branch Library
695 Moreland Way
Santa Clara CA 

There is no charge, but please register and arrive early: https://nskitlistpanel.eventbrite.com


Post-Event Mixer:
8:30 – 9:30 PM at 
Yan Can Asian Bistro (Across the street from the Library) 
The mixer is free; just pay for your own food and drinks. Some of the panelists will join us as well. 

This is a special opportunity to ask the questions you’ve always wanted to ask — and to get beyond the basics!

You are welcome to share this invitation with friends and colleagues, too. 

We hope to see you there!

Sue and Kelly Connelly 
(Yep, we’re sisters!) 
Your KIT List Team






Meeting this Saturday: “Getting a Job in the Digital Age: The Anti-Advice Talk” by Noted Anthropologist

12 05 2015

Hi Everyone,

There’s a great event coming up this Saturday by our friends with the Career Actions Network, which is a remarkable organization through MPPC (Menlo Park Presbyterian Church), that provides free services to help get people connected into jobs.

Presented by an anthropologist, Ilana Gershon, who was a visiting professor at Stanford, this is relevant information to those who want to change jobs (not only people who lost their jobs, but also the employed 50% who want to change jobs).

As a visiting professor at Stanford, Ilana spent last year researching job transition in Silicon Valley. She collaborated with the Career Actions Network while she was doing her research, and she is currently on their Advisory Board.

This is worth attending. Pass
the word and bring a friend!

Warmly,

Sue

20150512-162059.jpg
MPPC Career Actions Meeting 5/16:
“Getting a Job in the Digital Age: The Anti-Advice Talk” by Noted Anthropologist

New Attendees pre-register here (its free): www.careeractions.org

Saturday, May 16

ODCMV Fellowship Hall at 1667 Miramonte Ave., Mountain View, CA

Agenda:

9:30am: Coffee/networking

9:55am Topic: Getting a Job in the Digital Age: The Anti-Advice Talk

Guest Speaker: Ilana Gershon

About the presentation:

What do you need to do to get a job in this digital age? Do you need a LinkedIn profile? Are hiring managers looking for your personal brand? Ilana Gershon is an anthropology professor at Indiana University who thought asking job seekers, hiring managers, recruiters and HR how hiring works might shed some insights into what is actually going on in contemporary US as hiring and the nature of work changes. She did a year of fieldwork in the Bay Area, trying to figure out what has changed about hiring since the 1980s. Find out what an anthropologist has to say about hiring these days.

About the speaker:

Ilana Gershon is a cultural anthropologist at Indiana University interested in how new media transforms highly-charged social tasks, such as breaking up or hiring in the United States. She has written about how people use new media to end romantic relationships in The Breakup 2.0: Disconnecting over New Media. Her current research addresses how new media shapes hiring in post-recession U.S. companies.

In May or June, she will have a new edited collection of imagined career advice for real jobs around the world. If you want to know how to be a professional wrestler in Mexico or a magician in Paris, pick up a copy of A World of Work: Imagined Manuals for Real Jobs (Cornell University Press, 2015).





Salary Negotiations: An Art and a Science

24 02 2015

By Lisa Stotlar

Negotiating salaries and other benefits can be hard. It’s hard because it involves risk. It’s hard because you don’t do it very often.

I love making this process easier for people. There are some tricks of the trade I’ve picked up that I hope can help demystify the whole thing for you. Let’s start with why you might not do it. Fear. It is a powerful emotion and can be very useful in this situation. Distinguishing whether the fear you’re feeling is a warning to prepare well for the negotiation or a sign to avoid the whole thing altogether is a good first step.

Group of Business People with Green Business

I’ve had lots of clients who negotiate successfully and some who don’t. The difference is in the preparation, understanding/managing fear, and reading the employer’s signals during the negotiation. I call all this the “Art and Science” of negotiating. The “Science” is the formal prep you do beforehand and the “Art” is the tap-dancing you will need to do in the moment because you never know what they’ll throw at you in a conversation.

The “Science”

Books, web articles, and/or a good career counselor/coach can teach you the science of negotiating – the concrete how-to’s, the math of it, the “if this happens, then do this” scenarios, i.e., all the “homework” you need to do to prepare for the negotiation as well as how to handle your fears. But if you don’t work on your Art too, things can go badly, quickly.

The “Art”

Be sure and pay attention to the subtle clues you can collect during the whole interview process. By the time the offer arrives, you ideally will have a sense of whether the hiring manager/company is flexible, has some wiggle room in the budget, has rigid HR restrictions, really wants/needs you for the role, etc.

All these things give you an idea of how much you can ask for and how carefully you need to tread during the meeting. Remember to be fully present, listen carefully, and assess where the delicate balance/threshold is in the conversation. For example, if the person says his/her “hands are tied” and can’t give you X, then you need to hear that and thank them for letting you know rather than push the issue. Trying to stay on some script (the Science) would be a bad move at this moment.

Here are some real examples of how these things can play out well when you mix Art and Science:

Real Stories as Examples

One of my clients was offered $20K more than the fair market value for her type of job. She didn’t ask for more money, but she did negotiate other things. She had done her homework and was fully ready to negotiate, but the Art of this was to recognize that they were already going above and beyond for her and so it would have seemed odd/out of touch not to recognize that. She happily accepted the offer after a little back & forth about the start date. She wanted a real vacation before starting and was able to get that.

Another was offered a position at a major university. It was a very good offer, but he was coming from the corporate world and had been used to negotiating fairly hard. I recommended that he soften his tune for this if he really wanted the job. Universities often have clear guidelines about what they will and won’t offer. So gently asking if there was any flexibility in the salary was going to be a much better approach than assuming there was more money and simply throwing out a higher number. It turned out well. The hiring manager went back to HR to negotiate on my client’s behalf. The manager and my client were in a sense already a team – bonding over this issue. He ended up with just $2K more, but the positive relationship with this manager was worth its weight in gold. And he did get some other perks including the ability to work from home fairly regularly and to attend at least 2 national conferences every year.

Another client was afraid to negotiate, but was determined to do it and really worked hard on preparing. But … in the end, I actually recommended that he not negotiate salary or a signing bonus. I could sense the offer was a bit precarious and he was desperate for the job. He wasn’t able to fully recognize important nuances in conversation partly because English was his second language. Every time we role-played, he was very forceful in his language and tone. He ended up negotiating a later start date, plus 2 weeks off for a pre-planned vacation, and some tools he needed for the position like a laptop and cell phone. He’s been in the job for about 6 months now and loves it. He feels he negotiated well and I agree.

Win-Win

If you decide you want to negotiate the salary, remember the whole exchange needs to be a Win-Win. You want to get something (Win), but they need something too (Win). So if for example, you’re offered a salary of $100K and their range is $95-115K, then you need to ask for more than you ultimately want to end up with in order to bring their final offer amount up.

For example, let’s say you want to bring the offer up by at least $5K – then nicely ask if there’s some flexibility with the salary because you were “hoping to get something in the $110s, if possible.” This will hopefully get you a final offer of $105-110K. That would be more money for you (Win), but still less money than the high end of their range (Win). You both get something out of the deal.

Note: If you had just said directly – I’d like $105K, the middle ground (Win-Win) would have yielded you about $103K. So know going into the discussion where you want that final number to be and then plan your strategy accordingly.

Lots of things to potentially ask for …

When thinking about negotiating, think about all the things you might want to negotiate for. By expanding your options, you will have the overall Win-Win results you want. Consider …

  1. Title
  • Title can affect money and future titles
  1. Money
  • Base Salary
  • Salary increase at 3 or 6 months if meet specific criteria
  • Bonus (annual, at 3 months, signing bonus, etc.)
  • Commission
  • Profit sharing
  • Stock options
  • Overtime $ or Comp time
  • If not being given medical, etc., ask for additional $ (up to 30%)
  1. Time
  • Request time off for a scheduled vacation, surgery, etc.
  • Request a specific start date so you can have a real break before starting
  1. Schedule
  • Work remotely X days/week
  • Work off-site
  • Flexible work schedule
  • Later or earlier starting (or ending) time every day or on specific days
  • Longer lunches when you want them – or the ability to skip lunch and leave earlier
  • 4-day work week (10 hours/day) or some other variation you need/want
  • Work part-time or work part-time at particular times (for example, summers)
  1. Benefits
  • Medical/Dental/Vision/Disability/Life Insurance
  • Vacation days, comp time, wellness/personal days, doctor appointment & sick time, other?
  • Pension, 401K
  • Matching investment program
  • Parking costs/train pass
  • Childcare subsidy
  • Gym membership
  1. Training
  • Conferences
  • Association dues
  • Tuition Reimbursement for you, your children
  1. Equipment
  • Cell phone, laptop, car, etc.
  • Equipment for your home office if you’ll be doing work from home
  1. Relocation
  • Moving expenses
  • Mortgage assistance

By thinking about negotiations in a much larger context than just salary, and remembering to aim for the Win-Win, you can end up with a much more robust offer.

Remember, no matter how it all plays out, end the negotiations on a high note. Be grateful that they tried to get you a good salary, even if they ultimately aren’t able to offer you what you exactly want. Being gracious about the process and giving them a final “Yes, I happily accept” answer will start you on a very positive path.

I wish you all the best in your next negotiations!

About the Author:
Lisa Stotlar, MA is a career counselor/coach for CareerGenerations in Palo Alto, a career services firm she co-founded with Ellen Shulman, MA in 2010. She has successfully helped thousands of people discover and celebrate their gifts and find meaningful work – and negotiate all sorts of Win-Win packages. For questions about negotiating or other career topics, you’re welcome to schedule a free 15-minute phone consultation with Lisa or her colleague Ellen at www.careergenerations.com and if you’d like to know more about negotiating and gain some invaluable practice, sign up for their March 11 $mart Negotiations Workshop.





What Matters in Doing Your Best Work

27 10 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’m sharing this blog post by Sally Thornton that offers a different way of looking at your passions versus your skills in finding your path to meaningful work.

Warmly,

Sue

What Matters in Doing Your Best Work

By Sally Thornton, CEO and Founder of Forshay

We hear it so often: Follow your passions. Do what you love and the money will follow. But then we keep listening for more specific advice and, not surprisingly, it often conflicts.

Recently, Jeffrey Katzenberg surprised a crowd by suggesting that young people follow not their dreams, but their skills: “I believe every human being does something great. Follow that thing you’re actually really good at and that may become your passion.” In the parlance of the diagram above, he’s suggesting that the joy of doing something well, something you’re suited for, can turn a job into a career.

Meanwhile, in a speech to Stanford business school students, Oprah Winfrey suggests two keys to finding your “power base,” following your instincts and connecting your skills with your values: “Align your personality with your purpose, and no one can touch you.” In the language of the diagram above: when what you do well meets what the world needs, you turn a talent into a career.

I love Oprah more than I do Disney (although with Frozen maybe I can love both). But the thing Winfrey and Katzenberg have in common here is the assumption that both success and fulfillment require that we look consciously at our lives, taking into account both practical needs and less rational – but equally crucial – issues of fulfillment.

20141027-163719.jpgSo how do we apply all this to our actual lives-in-progress?

When I talk to people about finding satisfying work, the conversation often turns to deeper issues – what they like and don’t like doing day to day, and how that syncs (or doesn’t) with the effect they want to have on the world. The question underlying these conversations is a big one: “Does what I’m working on really matter?”

I often talk with people at crossroads in their careers. So many of them have succeeded by societal standards but, in the midst of that success, they feel something is missing – call it heart or impact. They’ve been heads down, working hard for so long, and finally they realize some part of their diagram of “doing your best work” is missing. And sometimes they conclude that, to find passion or meaning in work, they must make an enormous change. Give it all up. Do something entirely different.

For some people – the ones who should have been artists, activists, explorers all along – taking such a leap is a lifesaving move. But for many more, the changes they might want to make are more subtle, more of a recalibration. I ask these people to envision ways they could use their talents not to start anew but to expand what is possible. Which of their current skills can they offer the world, and in what capacities might exercising those skills bring them fulfillment? How can they use those skills in new ways? If the company where they work isn’t aligned with their values, can they find one that is or go freelance? What aspects of their current work take them away from what they value, and how can they shift their focus to give the world what they’re made to offer?

In short, for each of us, the diagram of “doing your best work” is a work in progress, one that continues to shift across our working lives. When we start to engage with the questions it represents, we move closer to work that we feel matters.

What does your diagram look like? What shifts do you need to make? Tell us what you think – join the conversation here.

About the Author:
Sally Thornton is Founder of Forshay (www.Forshay.com). Sally has extensive experience addressing the unique talent needs of the Bay Area’s most remarkable companies, including national business leaders such as Genentech and Levi Strauss, and rapid-growth startups.





Shutterfly Recruiting Open House – Tuesday, Sept 23 in Santa Clara

18 09 2014

Hello Everyone,

Shutterfly is hosting a Job Fair on 9/23. the details are in their invitation below!

Warmly,

Sue

Shutterfly Recruiting Open House – Job Fair

Tuesday, September 23rd
5:00pm – 7:00pm

Santa Clara Marriott
2700 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054

20140918-203804.jpg
Shutterfly Inc. invites you to join us at our Recruiting Open House to learn more about our career opportunities!

Join us on Tuesday, September 23rd where you will have the opportunity to meet our hiring managers, employees, and recruiting team for all of the Shutterfly Inc. brands: Shutterfly, Tiny Prints, Wedding Paper Divas and Treat.

We are hiring in the following departments:

– Accounting
– Business Development
– Creative Services
– Engineering
– Finance
– Marketing
– Merchandising

For a complete list of available positions, please view our available positions here: http://www.shutterfly.com/jobs

*Please indicate which roles you may be interested in learning more about in the Cover Letter section of the application.

Before you arrive at the event, be sure to Pre-Register by applying online.

http://hire.jobvite.com/j/?cj=ooavZfwM&s=KIT_List

Be sure to take a look at our Available Positions to see if there is a job that matches your interests and experience (http://www.shutterfly.com/about/positions.jsp?esch=1).

This is a great opportunity to learn more about Shutterfly Inc. and meet our wonderful teams.

Please feel free to share this invite with others that you would like to join the event. All are welcome!

We hope to see you at the event on Tuesday, September 23rd at the Santa Clara Marriott!





Free Presentation on 6/21: “How to Start a Business in Silicon Valley”

18 06 2014

Hello Everyone,

Here is an excellent free event this Saturday, 6/21, for those of you who may have a whole new future by starting your own business!

Menlo Park Presbyterian Church (MPPC) has a terrific career and jobs program though their Career Action Center and services. They have events every first and third Saturday in Mountain View, CA.

They’ve got a great topic this Saturday, 6/21.

Check out their site for their services (many of my own friends have sung its praises) and the info for this Saturday’s free event is below.

It’s SO worth it to get out and meet smart people and learn effective strategies for taking charge of your career.

Go for it!

Sue

http://mppc.org/calendar/career-actions-ministry

Saturday, June 21
9:30 to 11:30 a.m.,
Menlo Park Presbyterian Church (MPPC)
Mountain View (CA) Campus, Fellowship Hall

Guest Speaker: Jenny Huang and Peter Sanchez of the Silicon Valley Small Business Development Center

Presentation Topic: “How to start a business in Silicon Valley”

About the presentation:
Assess your entrepreneurial profile, understand the legal requirements, permits and licenses needed to start your business, get started on your business plan, and learn about the wealth of resources available to help your small business get started, grow, and thrive.

About the Speakers: Jenny Huang has over 20 years of experience as a marketing consultant, a brand marketer and communicator in the hardware, software and telecommunications industries. She brings a rich background in branding and marketing, and a passion in assisting any growing start up or progressive company in building a strong brand identity and marketing foundation essential for leadership and differentiation in a competitive, global market environment. Her thorough and laser-focused approach to problem solving helps companies prioritize critical elements to launch a successful business and drive growth through consistent innovation and execution. She is the Founder and CEO of a boutique strategic marketing consulting practice based in Mountain View. She also serves as a business advisor assisting clients who seek help in start-up assistance, marketing strategy and message development, business planning, market research and access to capital.

Peter Sanchez has a wealth of experience in residential real estate, technology, education and banking. He is retired Manufacturing Engineer from Inter Corp and is the Co-Founder of a housing development non-profit. He has co-founded various businesses including Pacific Bay Capital Group, College Now, Friends of MESA and Silicon Valley Venture Partners. He is very active in the community and promotes entrepreneurship within his professional space of influence. His has a Bachelor’s of Science in Industrial Tech. Electronics from San Jose State University.

About the Silicon Valley Small Business Development Center:

The Silicon Valley Small Business Development Center (SV-SBDC) is dedicated to the success of entrepreneurs in the Greater Silicon Valley Area, which includes Santa Clara and South San Mateo Counties.

They offer a wide variety of services for present and potential small business owners,including no-charge expert counseling, low-cost training, information resources, events and seminars.

SBDC business advisors can assist you and your business in becoming lendable and may introduce you to appropriate funding sources. They can crystallize your thoughts on growth strategies, guide you through tough human resource decisions, and map out strategies to increase your sales and profits. All counseling services are confidential and free of charge.

Contact SV-SBDC at http://svsbdc.org/ or 408-351-3610.

Directions to 1667 Miramonte Ave. in Mountain View, CA

Contact: Marcia Davis-Cannon

http://mppc.org/calendar/career-actions-ministry





Free training for PMP (Project Management Professional) certification in San Franciso

29 04 2014

Hi Everyone,

Someone from the KIT List was kind enough to send this information to me about an opportunity for job seekers to get the much-valued PMP certification…free of charge.

NOTE: If you know of other free or close-to-free job search or career develoment resources, please let me know and I’ll post it on the KIT Resources email list. If you’re not already subscribed to it, you can join by sending an email to KITlistResource-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

Please go to the links below to find out more about the PMP program — you do need to qualify for the funding, but the site will help you through the process.

One of the smart things to do when you’re out of work is to increase your value by building new skills. A PMP certification has long been recognized as an important accreditation.

Also, there are other great training programs through TechSF (http://www.bavc.org/techsf), so be sure to go to their site to find out more about their other services to job seekers!

Warmly,

Sue

****************
Register for TechSF & get funded to train in Project Management!

Project Management Bootcamp

https://bavc.org/project-management-bootcamp-may-12th-july-31

This intensive evening training beginning May 12th and finishing July 31st will target preparing students for the industry standard certification exam (PMP), as well as cover the following topics: project management theory of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and closing projects; using Microsoft Project software; career assessments, workshops, and counseling.

Prerequisites: a secondary or four-year degree; demonstrable project management experience

Find more information at bavc.org/tech-sf

Register for TechSF to get started!

Questions?
Contact natalie@bavc.org