“Career Choices You Will Regret In 20 Years” – By Bernard Marr

18 12 2014

Hello Everyone,

This article by Bernard Marr makes some excellent points that you may not have considered — or smart thinking you already know but need to reinforce in your job selection. This was worth sharing with our community!

Warmly,

Sue

Career Choices You Will Regret In 20 Years
By Bernard Marr

12-15-2014

Every day we are faced with choices in our careers that will affect us over the long term. Should I volunteer for that new project? Should I ask for a raise? Should I take a sabbatical? Should I say yes to overtime?

But sometimes we miss the biggest choices that will cause us to look back on our careers 20 years from now with pride and contentment — or regret.

Here are some of the career choices we often make but will regret deeply in 20 years’ time:

Pretending to be something you’re not.

Maybe you’re pretending to be a sports fan to impress your boss, or you’re keeping your mouth shut about something to keep the peace. Maybe you’re pretending that you’re an expert in something that’s really not your cup of tea. But continuously pretending to be something you’re not is not being true to yourself and will keep you feeling empty.

Making decisions based only on money.

Whether we’re talking about your personal salary or your project’s budget, making decisions solely based on money is almost never a good idea. Sure, it’s important to run the numbers, but there are dozens of other factors — including your gut feeling — you’ll want to take into account.

Thinking you can change something about the job.

Much like a relationship, if you go into a job thinking, “This would be the perfect job, if only…” that’s a red flag. Chances are, unless you’re taking a leadership, C-level position, you aren’t going to be able to change things that are fundamentally wrong.

Settling.

You’ve got an OK job, with an OK salary, and OK benefits, but what you really want is… You’re not doing yourself any favors settling for something that is just OK. Believe in yourself enough to go after what you deserve, whether it’s a new position, a pay rise, or an opportunity.

Working 50, 60, 80 hour weeks.

You might think you have to work that much — because it’s expected, because you need the money, because you want to look good to your boss — but no one reaches their deathbed and says, “Gosh, I wish I’d spent more time working.”

Putting friends and family last.

Being successful at your career means surrounding yourself with supportive people — and often, those people aren’t your coworkers or employees, they’re your friends and family. Ruin those relationships and you may find your career success just doesn’t matter as much.

Micromanaging everything.

This applies to your team and employees, but also to life in general. If you micromanage everything instead of sometimes just letting life happen, you’ll find yourself constantly battling anxiety and overwhelm.

Avoid making mistakes.

If you’re actively avoiding making mistakes in your career, then you’re not taking risks. And while you may keep up the status quo, you won’t be rewarded, either. Take the risk. Make the mistake. Own it and learn from it.

Thinking only of yourself.

The best networking strategy you can possibly have is to actively look for opportunities to help others. If you’re always putting yourself and your needs first, you’ll find you don’t get very far.

Not valuing your own happiness.

It’s a sad truth that people often believe they can put off happiness until later, but sometimes later doesn’t come. Prioritize being happy today. That might mean switching jobs, or it might just mean choosing to be happier with the job you’ve got.

What do you think are the biggest career choices people regret? As always, I’d love to hear your ideas and stories in the comments below.

Also, if you would like to read my regular posts send me a LinkedIn invite. And, of course, feel free to also connect via Twitter, Facebookand The Advanced Performance Institute.

About:
Bernard Marr is a globally recognized expert in strategy, performance management, analytics, KPIs and big data. He helps companies and executive teams manage, measure and improve performance. His latest books are ’25 Need-to-Know Key Performance Indicators’ and ‘Doing More with Less’.





Gratitude to Those Who Paid for Our Freedom

11 11 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’ve been so touched by the many Facebook posts by friends honoring dads, moms, and family members who gave courageously of their time, their health and many…their lives…to protect our freedom and for those in so many nations.

I’d like to bring a truly worthy non-profit to your attention if you’d like to donate today to help our wounded troops, Fisher House.

20141111-122506.jpgFisher House has a 4-Star 99.68% rating with Charity Navigator, and their mission is to help wounded and sick members of our military have their family come to their sides as they fight for their lives or struggle back from devastating injuries.

Please consider donating something today. You can also donate airline miles (Hero Miles) or hotel points to bring their families to them — which is such a vital part of their recovery:
https://www.fisherhouse.org/about/

As my own parents battled their own illnesses and ultimately passed away in the last few years, I know on the deepest level how important the love and physical presence of family is to those contending with serious illnesses. There is a wonderful Fisher House at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, and seeing the families there made me realize how much this younger generation of veterans need our help now.

20141111-123457.jpgMy Dad was honored to serve in WWII and he was grateful to survive to raise a family…and he remained profoundly moved by the experience. He honored his fallen friends and always had a special way of drawing out the stories, many horrific and traumatizing, from the veterans of all wars, many of whom could never talk before about their experiences.

One of his close friends, Jack Bradley, with whom he enlisted and went to boot camp, became one of the famous flag raisers of Iwo Jima in the famous photo above. Jack didn’t speak of the war, a decorated hero himself, but would only humbly say that “the real heroes died on Iwo Jima.” His son, James Bradley wrote an excellent book, which became a movie, called “Flags of Our Fathers” which is a valuable chronicle of the battle. Another remarkable story is “Unbroken” which is well worth reading before the movie comes out this Christmas.

Many generations of veterans and their families paved the way for the life and freedoms we enjoy today, and many died on foreign soil to give others a chance for freedom. I am profoundly grateful to all of them, and to their families who paid the price, and I join the rest of you in saying a deep THANK YOU.





What Matters in Doing Your Best Work

27 10 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’m sharing this blog post by Sally Thornton that offers a different way of looking at your passions versus your skills in finding your path to meaningful work.

Warmly,

Sue

What Matters in Doing Your Best Work

By Sally Thornton, CEO and Founder of Forshay

We hear it so often: Follow your passions. Do what you love and the money will follow. But then we keep listening for more specific advice and, not surprisingly, it often conflicts.

Recently, Jeffrey Katzenberg surprised a crowd by suggesting that young people follow not their dreams, but their skills: “I believe every human being does something great. Follow that thing you’re actually really good at and that may become your passion.” In the parlance of the diagram above, he’s suggesting that the joy of doing something well, something you’re suited for, can turn a job into a career.

Meanwhile, in a speech to Stanford business school students, Oprah Winfrey suggests two keys to finding your “power base,” following your instincts and connecting your skills with your values: “Align your personality with your purpose, and no one can touch you.” In the language of the diagram above: when what you do well meets what the world needs, you turn a talent into a career.

I love Oprah more than I do Disney (although with Frozen maybe I can love both). But the thing Winfrey and Katzenberg have in common here is the assumption that both success and fulfillment require that we look consciously at our lives, taking into account both practical needs and less rational – but equally crucial – issues of fulfillment.

20141027-163719.jpgSo how do we apply all this to our actual lives-in-progress?

When I talk to people about finding satisfying work, the conversation often turns to deeper issues – what they like and don’t like doing day to day, and how that syncs (or doesn’t) with the effect they want to have on the world. The question underlying these conversations is a big one: “Does what I’m working on really matter?”

I often talk with people at crossroads in their careers. So many of them have succeeded by societal standards but, in the midst of that success, they feel something is missing – call it heart or impact. They’ve been heads down, working hard for so long, and finally they realize some part of their diagram of “doing your best work” is missing. And sometimes they conclude that, to find passion or meaning in work, they must make an enormous change. Give it all up. Do something entirely different.

For some people – the ones who should have been artists, activists, explorers all along – taking such a leap is a lifesaving move. But for many more, the changes they might want to make are more subtle, more of a recalibration. I ask these people to envision ways they could use their talents not to start anew but to expand what is possible. Which of their current skills can they offer the world, and in what capacities might exercising those skills bring them fulfillment? How can they use those skills in new ways? If the company where they work isn’t aligned with their values, can they find one that is or go freelance? What aspects of their current work take them away from what they value, and how can they shift their focus to give the world what they’re made to offer?

In short, for each of us, the diagram of “doing your best work” is a work in progress, one that continues to shift across our working lives. When we start to engage with the questions it represents, we move closer to work that we feel matters.

What does your diagram look like? What shifts do you need to make? Tell us what you think – join the conversation here.

About the Author:
Sally Thornton is Founder of Forshay (www.Forshay.com). Sally has extensive experience addressing the unique talent needs of the Bay Area’s most remarkable companies, including national business leaders such as Genentech and Levi Strauss, and rapid-growth startups.





Shutterfly Recruiting Open House – Tuesday, Sept 23 in Santa Clara

18 09 2014

Hello Everyone,

Shutterfly is hosting a Job Fair on 9/23. the details are in their invitation below!

Warmly,

Sue

Shutterfly Recruiting Open House – Job Fair

Tuesday, September 23rd
5:00pm – 7:00pm

Santa Clara Marriott
2700 Mission College Blvd.
Santa Clara, CA 95054

20140918-203804.jpg
Shutterfly Inc. invites you to join us at our Recruiting Open House to learn more about our career opportunities!

Join us on Tuesday, September 23rd where you will have the opportunity to meet our hiring managers, employees, and recruiting team for all of the Shutterfly Inc. brands: Shutterfly, Tiny Prints, Wedding Paper Divas and Treat.

We are hiring in the following departments:

- Accounting
– Business Development
– Creative Services
– Engineering
– Finance
– Marketing
– Merchandising

For a complete list of available positions, please view our available positions here: http://www.shutterfly.com/jobs

*Please indicate which roles you may be interested in learning more about in the Cover Letter section of the application.

Before you arrive at the event, be sure to Pre-Register by applying online.

http://hire.jobvite.com/j/?cj=ooavZfwM&s=KIT_List

Be sure to take a look at our Available Positions to see if there is a job that matches your interests and experience (http://www.shutterfly.com/about/positions.jsp?esch=1).

This is a great opportunity to learn more about Shutterfly Inc. and meet our wonderful teams.

Please feel free to share this invite with others that you would like to join the event. All are welcome!

We hope to see you at the event on Tuesday, September 23rd at the Santa Clara Marriott!





Our SGI Reunion is this Monday, 9/22, in Palo Alto! Please RSVP.

18 09 2014

Hello Everyone,

For those of you who know the story of the KIT List, it started as my personal “Keep in Touch” (the meaning of the KIT name!) email list of my friends at Silicon Graphics. It grew simply by word-of-mouth to what I jokingly call 71,000 of my closest friends!

But for those of you who are present and last SGI employees or consultants (like me!), I wanted to make sure you knew about this year’s SGI reunion I’m organizing.

20140918-112834.jpg
Here are the details:

SGI Reunion
Monday, Sept. 22
The Patio
412 Emerson, Palo Alto
5:30 – 9:00

Please RSVP via the Evite at:
http://www.evite.com/event/020CXOF6IQI7M4WTSEPEGRT2ZVCOAU

It’s no-host, so it’s free to attend and you just buy your own drinks and food — or you can be a hero and buy some friends a drink!

We’ll be meeting on the back patio…and the weather is promising to be warm and balmy that evening.

Please pass the word to other SGIers so we don’t miss anyone!

I’m sorry, but this is for SGI folks only, though I will organize a KIT List networking event at another time. I’m just rushing to get this in while the weather is good!

Take care, everyone,

Sue





Can You Help Identify Internships for Worthy Teens?

3 09 2014

Hello Everyone,

I’d like to enlist your help to connect underserved high school students to internship opportunities in your company — or other companies in which you have friends.

I recently became aware of Genesys Works, a unique non-profit that marries workforce development with college prep.

The remarkable thing is that this program has been quite successful getting underserved teens onto a college and career track – while providing part-time tech-savvy resources for local companies.

20140903-143653.jpg
They transform underserved high schoolers into young professionals through technical training and afterschool internships during their senior year.

This program differs significantly from traditional high school internships, as the training enables these students to do real work in backoffice operations, rather than just fetch coffee or copies. And since it’s a yearlong engagement (not a quick summer job) both the company and the student gain deeper rewards overall.

Here’s the best part: over 12 years of operation, 96% of their students go on to college after graduating high school
– an option most had not even considered possible prior to the program.

Their partners include many Bay Area leaders such as PG&E, Accenture, McKesson, and Salesforce. They’ve also received some nice media coverage lately from ABC7 News and the SF Business Times.

They still looking for a few more positions this Fall for deserving students, so I’m hoping you can help.

If you think your company could benefit from this double bottom line approach, please contact their executive director (and longtime KITlist member!) Peter Katz at pkatz@genesysworks.org​

You can like Genesys Works – Bay Area on Facebook: www.facebook.com/genesysworksbayarea

Or check out their website:
www.genesysworks.org/bayarea

Let’s use the power of friends helping friends to create internship opportunities for these worthy teens — and give them a real shot at college and a promising future!

Thanks so much,

Sue





Forbes’ Pick of the Best Career Web Sites

30 08 2014

Hello Everyone,

I just ran across this great list this morning. I think Forbes will likely update it next month, but I suspect the majority of those on this list will remain!

20140830-100137.jpg
Since there’s no time like the present to learn about smarter ways to conduct a successful job search, I wanted to share this with you now.

The list of 100 resources may seem daunting…but if you just incorporate ONE change, that may prove to be the tipping point in your career!

I encourage you to make a commitment to try just one thing today. Here’s the link to the Forbes list:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/09/18/the-top-100-websites-for-your-career/2/

Here’s to your finding a job you’ll love,

Sue








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